As the media focus on Democrat candidates, Democrats are looking at Trump

Democrats will no doubt be distressed to learn that the progressive habit of politicizing absolutely everything is giving new weight to the law of unintended consequences.  A New Hampshire woman, horrified by the uproar in the knitting world a few months ago when woke knitters went on a rampage, found herself at the Trump rally in New Hampshire and went public about the pleasant surprises she found there.

In June 2019, the knitting world got woke, and it was ugly.  It got so ugly that it actually made the New York Times and the BBC.  People who were enjoying their craft were suddenly lambasted as racist cultural appropriators and worse.  Conservative knitters fled the knitting sites, and they were joined by independent and Democrat knitters who found it offensive to have politics invade their peaceful, creative hobby.

One of the Democrat knitters who left was Karlyn Borysenko, who describes herself as "an organizational psychologist and mindfulness expert."  It was the disruption of seeing ugly politics invade her hobby that led to Borysenko discovering #WalkAway, attending a Trump rally, and planning to cast her vote for Trump.

Borysenko describes her awakening in a detailed Medium article that is illuminating and worth examining.  It began when activists politicized her peaceful knitting kingdom:

It started about a year ago when roving gangs of online social justice warriors started going after anyone who was not lockstep in their ideology. People were bullied and mobbed by hundreds of people for such offenses as publishing an article expressing excitement about going on a trip to India, posting a video saying they were leaving IG because they were uncomfortable, and posting a poem asking for kindness.

Borysenko admits that when the furor began, she assumed that all Trump-supporters were racist, deplorable haters.  Seeing the ugliness from the other side made her revisit her assumptions and seek alternative data:

The more voices outside of the left I listened to, the more I realized that these were not bad people. They were not racists, nazis, or white supremacists. We had differences of opinions on social and economic issues, but a difference of opinion does not make your opponent inherently evil. And they could justify their opinions using arguments, rather than the shouting and ranting I had seen coming from my side of the aisle.

Her efforts to break free from the Progressive bubble led her to the #WalkAway movement — at which time she discovered that MSNBC was lying when it claimed that #WalkAway was a Russian bot fake.  From there, Borysenko couldn't stop asking questions:

I started to question everything. How many stories had I been sold that weren't true? What if my perception of the other side is wrong? How is it possible that half of the country is really overtly racist? Is it possible that Trump Derangement Syndrome is a real thing, and had I been suffering from it for the past three years?

And the biggest question of all was this: Did I hate Trump so much that I wanted to see my country fail just to spite him and everyone who voted for him?

The result of her inquiries is that earlier this week, Borysenko found herself at the Trump rally in Manchester, New Hampshire.  While she still doesn't like Trump the man, she was pleased with what she saw at the rally:

I had attended an event with all of the Democratic contenders just two days prior in exactly the same arena and the contrast was stark. First, Trump completely filled the arena all the way up to the top. Even with every major Democratic candidate in attendance the other night, and the campaigns giving away free tickets, the Democrats did not do that. With Trump, every single person was unified around a singular goal. With the Democrats, the audience booed over candidates they didn't like and got in literal shouting matches with each other. With Trump, there was a genuinely optimistic view of the future. With the Democrats, it was doom and gloom. With Trump, there was a genuine feeling of pride of being an American. With the Democrats, they emphasized that the country was a racist place from top to bottom.

Borysenko is fed up with the vision that the Democrats are trying to sell, one of a hate-filled, dystopian country.  She believes that there are good people on both sides of the political aisle, but that it is Trump, of all people, who is trying to stitch the country together, while the Democrats are working to divide.  She's now an independent, not a Democrat, and rejects the Democrats' divisiveness.

Her closing paragraph should instill terror in the hearts of the Democrat presidential candidates, shouting their hate and fear at the voters, and in the Democrat party as a whole:

I think the Democrats have an ass-kicking coming to them in November, and I think most of them will be utterly shocked when it happens because they're existing in an echo chamber that is not reflective of the broader reality. I hope it's a wake-up call and causes them to take a long look in the mirror and really ask themselves how they got here. Maybe then they'll start listening. I tend to doubt it, but I can hope.

Democrats will no doubt be distressed to learn that the progressive habit of politicizing absolutely everything is giving new weight to the law of unintended consequences.  A New Hampshire woman, horrified by the uproar in the knitting world a few months ago when woke knitters went on a rampage, found herself at the Trump rally in New Hampshire and went public about the pleasant surprises she found there.

In June 2019, the knitting world got woke, and it was ugly.  It got so ugly that it actually made the New York Times and the BBC.  People who were enjoying their craft were suddenly lambasted as racist cultural appropriators and worse.  Conservative knitters fled the knitting sites, and they were joined by independent and Democrat knitters who found it offensive to have politics invade their peaceful, creative hobby.

One of the Democrat knitters who left was Karlyn Borysenko, who describes herself as "an organizational psychologist and mindfulness expert."  It was the disruption of seeing ugly politics invade her hobby that led to Borysenko discovering #WalkAway, attending a Trump rally, and planning to cast her vote for Trump.

Borysenko describes her awakening in a detailed Medium article that is illuminating and worth examining.  It began when activists politicized her peaceful knitting kingdom:

It started about a year ago when roving gangs of online social justice warriors started going after anyone who was not lockstep in their ideology. People were bullied and mobbed by hundreds of people for such offenses as publishing an article expressing excitement about going on a trip to India, posting a video saying they were leaving IG because they were uncomfortable, and posting a poem asking for kindness.

Borysenko admits that when the furor began, she assumed that all Trump-supporters were racist, deplorable haters.  Seeing the ugliness from the other side made her revisit her assumptions and seek alternative data:

The more voices outside of the left I listened to, the more I realized that these were not bad people. They were not racists, nazis, or white supremacists. We had differences of opinions on social and economic issues, but a difference of opinion does not make your opponent inherently evil. And they could justify their opinions using arguments, rather than the shouting and ranting I had seen coming from my side of the aisle.

Her efforts to break free from the Progressive bubble led her to the #WalkAway movement — at which time she discovered that MSNBC was lying when it claimed that #WalkAway was a Russian bot fake.  From there, Borysenko couldn't stop asking questions:

I started to question everything. How many stories had I been sold that weren't true? What if my perception of the other side is wrong? How is it possible that half of the country is really overtly racist? Is it possible that Trump Derangement Syndrome is a real thing, and had I been suffering from it for the past three years?

And the biggest question of all was this: Did I hate Trump so much that I wanted to see my country fail just to spite him and everyone who voted for him?

The result of her inquiries is that earlier this week, Borysenko found herself at the Trump rally in Manchester, New Hampshire.  While she still doesn't like Trump the man, she was pleased with what she saw at the rally:

I had attended an event with all of the Democratic contenders just two days prior in exactly the same arena and the contrast was stark. First, Trump completely filled the arena all the way up to the top. Even with every major Democratic candidate in attendance the other night, and the campaigns giving away free tickets, the Democrats did not do that. With Trump, every single person was unified around a singular goal. With the Democrats, the audience booed over candidates they didn't like and got in literal shouting matches with each other. With Trump, there was a genuinely optimistic view of the future. With the Democrats, it was doom and gloom. With Trump, there was a genuine feeling of pride of being an American. With the Democrats, they emphasized that the country was a racist place from top to bottom.

Borysenko is fed up with the vision that the Democrats are trying to sell, one of a hate-filled, dystopian country.  She believes that there are good people on both sides of the political aisle, but that it is Trump, of all people, who is trying to stitch the country together, while the Democrats are working to divide.  She's now an independent, not a Democrat, and rejects the Democrats' divisiveness.

Her closing paragraph should instill terror in the hearts of the Democrat presidential candidates, shouting their hate and fear at the voters, and in the Democrat party as a whole:

I think the Democrats have an ass-kicking coming to them in November, and I think most of them will be utterly shocked when it happens because they're existing in an echo chamber that is not reflective of the broader reality. I hope it's a wake-up call and causes them to take a long look in the mirror and really ask themselves how they got here. Maybe then they'll start listening. I tend to doubt it, but I can hope.