Too many ironies in the fire?

As if the Democrats' Soylent Green "new deal" hasn't given us enough chaff to separate from wheat, Ohio state senator Tina Maharath (D-Columbus) has introduced Senate Bill 78 to criminalize smoking in a motor vehicle when children younger than age six are onboard.

The concerned senator considers exposure to tobacco smoke "child abuse," and so it well may be.  The thrust of her mission is to "protect children who don't have the chance to make a choice for themselves."  Well said, senator — well said.

The question arises as to whether Senator Maharath will consistently apply her argument to criminalizing late-term abortion in the State of Ohio.  Will she with equal fervor apply her legislative passion to protect the lives of children in the womb (who undoubtedly do not have the "chance to make a choice for themselves")?

Should Senate Bill 78 eventually pass into law, a mother with a smoldering Marlboro clenched between her lips while navigating Ohio roads with her child in tow would be subject to a fine of $500 for the first such offense.  Ironically, the same mother can lawfully choose to end the life of her child in Ohio with financial assistance from any number of government-supported programs.

Smoke from the fires of irony at the Ohio Senate may be more toxic than that inhaled secondhand from tobacco. 

As if the Democrats' Soylent Green "new deal" hasn't given us enough chaff to separate from wheat, Ohio state senator Tina Maharath (D-Columbus) has introduced Senate Bill 78 to criminalize smoking in a motor vehicle when children younger than age six are onboard.

The concerned senator considers exposure to tobacco smoke "child abuse," and so it well may be.  The thrust of her mission is to "protect children who don't have the chance to make a choice for themselves."  Well said, senator — well said.

The question arises as to whether Senator Maharath will consistently apply her argument to criminalizing late-term abortion in the State of Ohio.  Will she with equal fervor apply her legislative passion to protect the lives of children in the womb (who undoubtedly do not have the "chance to make a choice for themselves")?

Should Senate Bill 78 eventually pass into law, a mother with a smoldering Marlboro clenched between her lips while navigating Ohio roads with her child in tow would be subject to a fine of $500 for the first such offense.  Ironically, the same mother can lawfully choose to end the life of her child in Ohio with financial assistance from any number of government-supported programs.

Smoke from the fires of irony at the Ohio Senate may be more toxic than that inhaled secondhand from tobacco.