New Zealand imposes draconian censorship in wake of mosque massacre

There are some ominous signs that the government of New Zealand will be granting the wish of the deranged mosque killer by taking actions that can only aggravate tensions in that normally peaceful island nation.  I fully stipulate that the Kiwis have the best of intentions, but we all know where the road paved with them leads.

Yesterday, I wrote about the P.M. donning a hijab and the airwaves being filled with Islamic prayers.


YouTube screen grab.

But today comes news that the heavy hand of censorship already is being imposed in New Zealand, with the ominous possibility of more drastic repression of thought on the way, thanks to the announcement that a Royal Commission is being convened. News.com.au reports:

New Zealand's prime minister has announced a top-level inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the massacre of 50 people in two Christchurch mosques.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says the country's highest form of investigation, a royal commission of inquiry, was appropriate for "matters of the gravest public importance."

Her Cabinet had previously agreed on holding an inquiry, but had not decided what kind of investigation would be held.

She said the Cabinet agreed on Monday that a royal commission of inquiry "will look at what could have or should have been done to prevent the attack."

Those words, "what should have been done to prevent the attack," worry me.  The country already has announced draconian gun control, including mandatory buybacks, so what's left?  How about banning criticism of Islam — as sharia law demands?  What makes this probability look high is that New Zealand already has banned the shooter's manifesto:

New Zealand is also debating the limits of free speech after their chief censor banned the 74-page manifesto written and released by the man accused of slaughtering 50 people at two mosques in the city.

The ban, issued on Saturday, means anybody caught with the document on their computer could face up to 10 years in prison, while anyone caught sending it could face 14 years. Some say the ban goes too far and risks lending both the document and the gunman mystique.

Ten years in prison for having a copy on your computer?  That is incredible and suggests an iron hand of repression.  It is a short step from this measure to an outright ban of criticism of Islam, because it might lead to another attack...supposedly.  Meanwhile, Kiwis who love liberty already have cause for grave concern, even anger.

Given the fact that Mein Kampf remains openly sold in New Zealand while  "one New Zealand book chain has pulled the best-selling book 12 Rules for Life by Jordan Peterson simply because he dared to pose with some fan who had a t-shirt on which was critical of Islam," it is not unthinkable to worry about serious thought control being a prospect down under.

Hat tip: John McMahon.

There are some ominous signs that the government of New Zealand will be granting the wish of the deranged mosque killer by taking actions that can only aggravate tensions in that normally peaceful island nation.  I fully stipulate that the Kiwis have the best of intentions, but we all know where the road paved with them leads.

Yesterday, I wrote about the P.M. donning a hijab and the airwaves being filled with Islamic prayers.


YouTube screen grab.

But today comes news that the heavy hand of censorship already is being imposed in New Zealand, with the ominous possibility of more drastic repression of thought on the way, thanks to the announcement that a Royal Commission is being convened. News.com.au reports:

New Zealand's prime minister has announced a top-level inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the massacre of 50 people in two Christchurch mosques.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says the country's highest form of investigation, a royal commission of inquiry, was appropriate for "matters of the gravest public importance."

Her Cabinet had previously agreed on holding an inquiry, but had not decided what kind of investigation would be held.

She said the Cabinet agreed on Monday that a royal commission of inquiry "will look at what could have or should have been done to prevent the attack."

Those words, "what should have been done to prevent the attack," worry me.  The country already has announced draconian gun control, including mandatory buybacks, so what's left?  How about banning criticism of Islam — as sharia law demands?  What makes this probability look high is that New Zealand already has banned the shooter's manifesto:

New Zealand is also debating the limits of free speech after their chief censor banned the 74-page manifesto written and released by the man accused of slaughtering 50 people at two mosques in the city.

The ban, issued on Saturday, means anybody caught with the document on their computer could face up to 10 years in prison, while anyone caught sending it could face 14 years. Some say the ban goes too far and risks lending both the document and the gunman mystique.

Ten years in prison for having a copy on your computer?  That is incredible and suggests an iron hand of repression.  It is a short step from this measure to an outright ban of criticism of Islam, because it might lead to another attack...supposedly.  Meanwhile, Kiwis who love liberty already have cause for grave concern, even anger.

Given the fact that Mein Kampf remains openly sold in New Zealand while  "one New Zealand book chain has pulled the best-selling book 12 Rules for Life by Jordan Peterson simply because he dared to pose with some fan who had a t-shirt on which was critical of Islam," it is not unthinkable to worry about serious thought control being a prospect down under.

Hat tip: John McMahon.