Justin Trudeau equated procuring prostitutes with supporting Canadian workers

Canada's golden boy prime minister, Justin Trudeau, is embroiled in a serious scandal involving one of Quebec's top construction firms and the interference by his office in legal troubles being experienced by the firm.

According to testimony given by his former attorney general, Jody Wilson-Raybould, the prime minister's office pressured her to end the prosecution of Lavalin.  While apparently not technically illegal, Trudeau's efforts are widely seen as interference in the judicial process.

Chicago Tribune:

"I experienced a consistent and sustained effort by many people within the government to seek to politically interfere," the former attorney general said Wednesday afternoon.  Wilson-Raybould, who quit the cabinet this month, also said she faced "veiled threats" about what might happen if she refused to order an out-of-court settlement.

Her testimony shook the core of the Trudeau's team, naming him, his finance chief and his most senior aides.  The Conservative leader trying to unseat Trudeau in this fall's election called for his resignation, but the prime minister stood his ground and rejected Wilson-Raybould's version of events.

The public airing of grievances will inflame the scandal, which has driven the governing Liberals lower in national polls. The ordeal dredges up ghosts of the party's past, which is marked by hand-in-glove ties with corporate Canada — particularly in Quebec.  The political fallout, however, is difficult to predict.  Trudeau's path to re-election runs through the largely French-speaking province, where his defense of SNC-Lavalin is being applauded.

Lavalin is accused of corrupt practices.  It's been reported that the company supplied the son of former Libyan dictator Moammar Gaddafi with prostitutes in order to get favorable consideration on a contract.

Trudeau was asked about the matter during question time.

Daily Caller:

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau equated the procurement of prostitutes as one way his government can "stand up for Canadian jobs," in a Wednesday Question Period exchange with the Official Opposition Conservatives.

In response to a question from Conservative immigration critic Michelle Rempel about a report that the embattled Quebec contractor SNC-Lavalin paid $30,000 (CND) to entertain Muammar Gaddafi's son with prostitutes, Trudeau appeared to not only confirm the story; he also tried to exonerate the company.

Rempel was quizzing Trudeau in the House of Commons about the unfolding scandal that threatens to take down the Trudeau government.  Former Attorney General Jody Wilson-Raybould says she was instructed by numerous high-ranking officials in the Prime Minister's Office to block the prosecution against Quebec mega-contractor SNC-Lavalin on fraud charges.

Referring to the "$30,000 worth of Canadian prostitutes that were given to Muammar Gaddafi's son," Rempel noted "this is the so-called victimless crime that our quote 'feminist' prime minister is moving mountains to cover up.  When did the prime minister learn that SNC-Lavalin paid for prostitutes for Muammar Gaddafi's son?"

Trudeau answered, "Every step of the way, we will stand up for Canadians workers, we will stand up for Canadian jobs right across this country and we will do so in a way that is consistent with our values ..." 

Rempel told The Daily Caller on Friday that she was shocked at Trudeau's response to her question.

"He needs to resign," she said.  "He's a disgusting failure that no longer has the moral authority to govern.  He needs to go."

So playing pimp for the son of a dictator is "consistent" with Canadian values?  That might come as a shock to a lot of Canadian citizens.

Trudeau is being exposed as an empty suit, and the more people get to know the rock-star prime minister, the more they see through the carefully crafted façade.  He's a pretty face in over his head, and with most opinion surveys now showing his Liberal Party trailing the conservatives for the fall election, Canadian voters may finally be waking up.

Canada's golden boy prime minister, Justin Trudeau, is embroiled in a serious scandal involving one of Quebec's top construction firms and the interference by his office in legal troubles being experienced by the firm.

According to testimony given by his former attorney general, Jody Wilson-Raybould, the prime minister's office pressured her to end the prosecution of Lavalin.  While apparently not technically illegal, Trudeau's efforts are widely seen as interference in the judicial process.

Chicago Tribune:

"I experienced a consistent and sustained effort by many people within the government to seek to politically interfere," the former attorney general said Wednesday afternoon.  Wilson-Raybould, who quit the cabinet this month, also said she faced "veiled threats" about what might happen if she refused to order an out-of-court settlement.

Her testimony shook the core of the Trudeau's team, naming him, his finance chief and his most senior aides.  The Conservative leader trying to unseat Trudeau in this fall's election called for his resignation, but the prime minister stood his ground and rejected Wilson-Raybould's version of events.

The public airing of grievances will inflame the scandal, which has driven the governing Liberals lower in national polls. The ordeal dredges up ghosts of the party's past, which is marked by hand-in-glove ties with corporate Canada — particularly in Quebec.  The political fallout, however, is difficult to predict.  Trudeau's path to re-election runs through the largely French-speaking province, where his defense of SNC-Lavalin is being applauded.

Lavalin is accused of corrupt practices.  It's been reported that the company supplied the son of former Libyan dictator Moammar Gaddafi with prostitutes in order to get favorable consideration on a contract.

Trudeau was asked about the matter during question time.

Daily Caller:

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau equated the procurement of prostitutes as one way his government can "stand up for Canadian jobs," in a Wednesday Question Period exchange with the Official Opposition Conservatives.

In response to a question from Conservative immigration critic Michelle Rempel about a report that the embattled Quebec contractor SNC-Lavalin paid $30,000 (CND) to entertain Muammar Gaddafi's son with prostitutes, Trudeau appeared to not only confirm the story; he also tried to exonerate the company.

Rempel was quizzing Trudeau in the House of Commons about the unfolding scandal that threatens to take down the Trudeau government.  Former Attorney General Jody Wilson-Raybould says she was instructed by numerous high-ranking officials in the Prime Minister's Office to block the prosecution against Quebec mega-contractor SNC-Lavalin on fraud charges.

Referring to the "$30,000 worth of Canadian prostitutes that were given to Muammar Gaddafi's son," Rempel noted "this is the so-called victimless crime that our quote 'feminist' prime minister is moving mountains to cover up.  When did the prime minister learn that SNC-Lavalin paid for prostitutes for Muammar Gaddafi's son?"

Trudeau answered, "Every step of the way, we will stand up for Canadians workers, we will stand up for Canadian jobs right across this country and we will do so in a way that is consistent with our values ..." 

Rempel told The Daily Caller on Friday that she was shocked at Trudeau's response to her question.

"He needs to resign," she said.  "He's a disgusting failure that no longer has the moral authority to govern.  He needs to go."

So playing pimp for the son of a dictator is "consistent" with Canadian values?  That might come as a shock to a lot of Canadian citizens.

Trudeau is being exposed as an empty suit, and the more people get to know the rock-star prime minister, the more they see through the carefully crafted façade.  He's a pretty face in over his head, and with most opinion surveys now showing his Liberal Party trailing the conservatives for the fall election, Canadian voters may finally be waking up.