It's already here: Jew-hatred now normal and unworthy of notice in many segments of society

History teaches us where this leads, but very few people are willing to even notice, while the national media pretend it isn't happening.

Make no mistake: thanks to our friends on the Left, many segments of our society now feel there is nothing wrong — or even out of the ordinary — in expressing hatred of Jews.  And our friends in the mainstream media are doing their best to avoid notice (so much for the classic trope that "Jews control the media").  In the media capital of New York City, a wave of violent attacks on Jews walking the streets of Brooklyn, along with swastikas on synagogues and other signs of a war on Jews, has been enough to alarm the NYPD, but it largely is ignored by the national media, headquartered just across the East River.

It now is considered normal in many circles to express hatred of Jews simply because they are Jews.

Consider this mural that, in the words of the Los Angeles Times, "depicts a Grim Reaper wearing a cloak covered with Stars of David, holding what appears to be a dead baby and a missile."

As the L.A. Times reports:

The mural is painted on a brick building that's home to the Vortex, a 400-person event space in downtown Los Angeles.

The Vortex said in a statement on Facebook that the mural was created several years ago to acknowledge the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks as part of the "L.A. vs. War" art show.

The company said it "stands for free expression" and that the artist "did not intend to express an anti-Semitic message."

Yeah, right.  Do they even believe this themselves?  That they saw nothing wrong with allowing this to be painted and on display for years tells us that Jew-hatred now is seen as normal, to be expected, and completely unworthy of note.

The term "anti-Semitism" is inadequate to describe what is going on today in America and ought to be discarded in favor of the more realistic and accurate expression "Jew-hatred."  It was created as a euphemism in 19th-century Britain to avoid indelicate words like "Jew" and "hate."

Avoiding facing the awful truth only allows the hate to metastasize.

History teaches us where this leads, but very few people are willing to even notice, while the national media pretend it isn't happening.

Make no mistake: thanks to our friends on the Left, many segments of our society now feel there is nothing wrong — or even out of the ordinary — in expressing hatred of Jews.  And our friends in the mainstream media are doing their best to avoid notice (so much for the classic trope that "Jews control the media").  In the media capital of New York City, a wave of violent attacks on Jews walking the streets of Brooklyn, along with swastikas on synagogues and other signs of a war on Jews, has been enough to alarm the NYPD, but it largely is ignored by the national media, headquartered just across the East River.

It now is considered normal in many circles to express hatred of Jews simply because they are Jews.

Consider this mural that, in the words of the Los Angeles Times, "depicts a Grim Reaper wearing a cloak covered with Stars of David, holding what appears to be a dead baby and a missile."

As the L.A. Times reports:

The mural is painted on a brick building that's home to the Vortex, a 400-person event space in downtown Los Angeles.

The Vortex said in a statement on Facebook that the mural was created several years ago to acknowledge the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks as part of the "L.A. vs. War" art show.

The company said it "stands for free expression" and that the artist "did not intend to express an anti-Semitic message."

Yeah, right.  Do they even believe this themselves?  That they saw nothing wrong with allowing this to be painted and on display for years tells us that Jew-hatred now is seen as normal, to be expected, and completely unworthy of note.

The term "anti-Semitism" is inadequate to describe what is going on today in America and ought to be discarded in favor of the more realistic and accurate expression "Jew-hatred."  It was created as a euphemism in 19th-century Britain to avoid indelicate words like "Jew" and "hate."

Avoiding facing the awful truth only allows the hate to metastasize.