Debbie Dingell's daddy issues

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (D-Michigan) has "daddy issues."  She thinks her "issues" trump the Second Amendment's guarantee that the "right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed."

Last week, the Democratic-controlled House passed H.R. 8, mandating federally licensed dealer background checks on private gun transfers.  The legislation would make it illegal for your cousin to sell you a hunting rifle without a background check, and it would make it illegal for hunting partners and neighbors to swap or sell firearms to each other.

During the debate on the House floor, Rep. Dingell let loose with an unhinged, hysterical rant about how she was terrified as a child because her father was "mentally ill" and "shouldn't have had a gun."  When her mother bought a gun for self-protection, she was terrified, of that, too:

I had to HIDE IN THE CLOSET with my siblings, wonder if we — wondering if we would live or DIE!

One night, I kept my father from killing my mother. He SHOULDN'T HAVE HAD A GUN! My mother went out and bought a gun! And then all of us were scared to death about HER gun and my father's gun. We had TWO GUNS to worry about!

NO child, NO woman, NO man should ever have to go through THAT!!!

It's really worth watching the video embedded here to get an idea of what passes for "sober deliberation" in the august halls of Congress these days.  (Dingell's remarks begin at 1:45 and last until 2:17).

What makes the whole diatribe even weirder is that Congresswoman Dingell — who seems to have a penchant for freakish and childish eyeglasses — is the widow of the recently departed Rep. John Dingell — a Blue Dog Democrat, lifelong defender of the Second Amendment, and member of the NRA Board of Directors.  (John Dingell was almost 30 years older than his wife… old enough to be her father.  Hmm...)

It's frightening that our rights are in the hands of people as unglued as Debbie Dingell.  None of us knows what really happened in Dingell's household when the now 65-year-old member of Congress was a child, but even if everything she claims is true, it does not follow that the constitutional rights of the entire nation must be abridged on account of it.  Congresswoman Dingell does not say where her father got his gun from, but under the legislation she voted for, if he got it from a parent, grandparent, or sibling, he would have been exempt from a background check anyway.  And, had Congresswoman Dingell's father not had a gun, he could have presumably terrorized his family just as easily with a butcher knife or baseball bat.  If he was really as mentally ill as she claims, then he should have been committed.

But none of this matters if you're ruled by childish emotions rather than principles and logic.  The belief that women were emotional rather than rational led the Athenian playwright Aristophanes to mock the idea that they could govern in his comedy The Assembly of Women — not to mention the fact that the English word "hysterical" is derived from the Greek word for "uterus."

Of course, there are many sober, measured, rational, and intelligent female legislators — but they all seem to be Republicans.

Among the Democrats —  like Dingell, Mazie Hirono, Maxine Waters, Kirsten Gillibrand, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and Rashida Tlaib — a shrill, emotional, irrational gyno-lunacy seems to be the norm.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (D-Michigan) has "daddy issues."  She thinks her "issues" trump the Second Amendment's guarantee that the "right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed."

Last week, the Democratic-controlled House passed H.R. 8, mandating federally licensed dealer background checks on private gun transfers.  The legislation would make it illegal for your cousin to sell you a hunting rifle without a background check, and it would make it illegal for hunting partners and neighbors to swap or sell firearms to each other.

During the debate on the House floor, Rep. Dingell let loose with an unhinged, hysterical rant about how she was terrified as a child because her father was "mentally ill" and "shouldn't have had a gun."  When her mother bought a gun for self-protection, she was terrified, of that, too:

I had to HIDE IN THE CLOSET with my siblings, wonder if we — wondering if we would live or DIE!

One night, I kept my father from killing my mother. He SHOULDN'T HAVE HAD A GUN! My mother went out and bought a gun! And then all of us were scared to death about HER gun and my father's gun. We had TWO GUNS to worry about!

NO child, NO woman, NO man should ever have to go through THAT!!!

It's really worth watching the video embedded here to get an idea of what passes for "sober deliberation" in the august halls of Congress these days.  (Dingell's remarks begin at 1:45 and last until 2:17).

What makes the whole diatribe even weirder is that Congresswoman Dingell — who seems to have a penchant for freakish and childish eyeglasses — is the widow of the recently departed Rep. John Dingell — a Blue Dog Democrat, lifelong defender of the Second Amendment, and member of the NRA Board of Directors.  (John Dingell was almost 30 years older than his wife… old enough to be her father.  Hmm...)

It's frightening that our rights are in the hands of people as unglued as Debbie Dingell.  None of us knows what really happened in Dingell's household when the now 65-year-old member of Congress was a child, but even if everything she claims is true, it does not follow that the constitutional rights of the entire nation must be abridged on account of it.  Congresswoman Dingell does not say where her father got his gun from, but under the legislation she voted for, if he got it from a parent, grandparent, or sibling, he would have been exempt from a background check anyway.  And, had Congresswoman Dingell's father not had a gun, he could have presumably terrorized his family just as easily with a butcher knife or baseball bat.  If he was really as mentally ill as she claims, then he should have been committed.

But none of this matters if you're ruled by childish emotions rather than principles and logic.  The belief that women were emotional rather than rational led the Athenian playwright Aristophanes to mock the idea that they could govern in his comedy The Assembly of Women — not to mention the fact that the English word "hysterical" is derived from the Greek word for "uterus."

Of course, there are many sober, measured, rational, and intelligent female legislators — but they all seem to be Republicans.

Among the Democrats —  like Dingell, Mazie Hirono, Maxine Waters, Kirsten Gillibrand, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and Rashida Tlaib — a shrill, emotional, irrational gyno-lunacy seems to be the norm.