Project Veritas video exposes TN Dem Senate candidate as a liar about supporting Kavanaugh

It's a given that politicians are two faced. They can be counted on to say one thing while thinking another.

But that truism is usually unprovable - unless James O'Keefe and his trusty hidden camera are at work to expose the lie.

O'Keefe's Project Vertias has struck again, this time, recording staffers working for Tennessee Democratic Senate candidate Philip Bredesen saying that despite the candidate's public statement that if he had been in the senate, he would have voted to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, he privately admitted he would have opposed him.

Maria Amalla and Will Stewart, staffers in Bredesen’s campaign, both say on hidden camera that if he were in the Senate, Bredesen would not actually have voted to confirm then-Judge Brett Kavanaugh. They explained that the statement Bredesen issued in support of Kavanaugh was a political ploy to gain the support of moderate voters in Tennessee.

JOURNALIST: “Like he wouldn’t really vote yes [for Kavanaugh,] would he?

AMALLA: “No, it’s a political move… He thinks that like we’re down like half a point right now. It’s like really close and we’re losing by a point or two. So he thinks that if like by saying this he’s appealing to more moderate republicans and he’ll get more of them to vote for us.”


JOURNALIST: “I was so confused because I just can’t believe he would actually vote [for Kavanaugh.]

STEWART: “He wouldn’t. But he’s saying he would… Which I don’t know if it makes it worse or better. No, it makes it better… “

When asked to clarify that Bredesen is only saying he’d vote for Kavanaugh to “get the Republican vote,” Amalla, a field organizer for Bredesen’s campaign, affirmed, “Yes.” Amalla reiterated, “[Bredesen] thought that like by coming out in support [of Justice Kavanaugh] that it would get more republicans on his side. He wasn’t doing as well in the rural parts.”

No surprise there. But Bredesen's lying goes even further.

In multiple conversations, Bredesen staffers admitted that Bredesen does not want to fully communicate his connection to the national leadership of the Democratic party. Stewart and a colleague on the Bredesen campaign, Drew Marshall say:

MARSHALL: “We would scare all the people who would vote for Phil Bredesen, but not [Senate Democratic Leader] Chuck Schumer.”

STEWART: “Yeah, exactly, because there’s a lot of republicans who are going to vote for [Bredesen…]”

STEWART: “Yeah. And that’s how they’re messaging against us… that he’s gonna be a ‘toe the line’ democrat voter… Because there are people who loved him as Governor but won’t vote for a democrat for national office.”

Stewart reiterated the Bredesen Campaign’s commitment to appearing moderate for the election, “we’re trying to make it so it’s not about democrats.” Stewart makes clear Bredesen’s messaging is purely for political optics, saying:

STEWART: “Between you and me once Phil actually gets into the Senate, he’ll be a good Democrat.”

Of course, this is music to the ears of GOP candidate, Rep. Marsha Blackburn. Being a "good Democrat" means asking "how high" when Chuck Schumer tells him to jump. The video will make it ridiculously easy to link Schumer to Bredesen in a death embrace.

The most recent polls have Blackburn ahead. This video should just about seal the deal for Blackburn.

It's a given that politicians are two faced. They can be counted on to say one thing while thinking another.

But that truism is usually unprovable - unless James O'Keefe and his trusty hidden camera are at work to expose the lie.

O'Keefe's Project Vertias has struck again, this time, recording staffers working for Tennessee Democratic Senate candidate Philip Bredesen saying that despite the candidate's public statement that if he had been in the senate, he would have voted to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, he privately admitted he would have opposed him.

Maria Amalla and Will Stewart, staffers in Bredesen’s campaign, both say on hidden camera that if he were in the Senate, Bredesen would not actually have voted to confirm then-Judge Brett Kavanaugh. They explained that the statement Bredesen issued in support of Kavanaugh was a political ploy to gain the support of moderate voters in Tennessee.

JOURNALIST: “Like he wouldn’t really vote yes [for Kavanaugh,] would he?

AMALLA: “No, it’s a political move… He thinks that like we’re down like half a point right now. It’s like really close and we’re losing by a point or two. So he thinks that if like by saying this he’s appealing to more moderate republicans and he’ll get more of them to vote for us.”


JOURNALIST: “I was so confused because I just can’t believe he would actually vote [for Kavanaugh.]

STEWART: “He wouldn’t. But he’s saying he would… Which I don’t know if it makes it worse or better. No, it makes it better… “

When asked to clarify that Bredesen is only saying he’d vote for Kavanaugh to “get the Republican vote,” Amalla, a field organizer for Bredesen’s campaign, affirmed, “Yes.” Amalla reiterated, “[Bredesen] thought that like by coming out in support [of Justice Kavanaugh] that it would get more republicans on his side. He wasn’t doing as well in the rural parts.”

No surprise there. But Bredesen's lying goes even further.

In multiple conversations, Bredesen staffers admitted that Bredesen does not want to fully communicate his connection to the national leadership of the Democratic party. Stewart and a colleague on the Bredesen campaign, Drew Marshall say:

MARSHALL: “We would scare all the people who would vote for Phil Bredesen, but not [Senate Democratic Leader] Chuck Schumer.”

STEWART: “Yeah, exactly, because there’s a lot of republicans who are going to vote for [Bredesen…]”

STEWART: “Yeah. And that’s how they’re messaging against us… that he’s gonna be a ‘toe the line’ democrat voter… Because there are people who loved him as Governor but won’t vote for a democrat for national office.”

Stewart reiterated the Bredesen Campaign’s commitment to appearing moderate for the election, “we’re trying to make it so it’s not about democrats.” Stewart makes clear Bredesen’s messaging is purely for political optics, saying:

STEWART: “Between you and me once Phil actually gets into the Senate, he’ll be a good Democrat.”

Of course, this is music to the ears of GOP candidate, Rep. Marsha Blackburn. Being a "good Democrat" means asking "how high" when Chuck Schumer tells him to jump. The video will make it ridiculously easy to link Schumer to Bredesen in a death embrace.

The most recent polls have Blackburn ahead. This video should just about seal the deal for Blackburn.