The merry month of May

Like many people, I am looking forward to the end of April.  My attitude is similar to the feeling I had when living in Minnesota and winter showed signs of ending.  I will be able to leave the house for non-essential activities, like a walk in the park or by a lake.  Spring in a cold climate always reminds me of the joy of freedom.

I think the current restrictions are seriously overdone, but a lifetime of being law-abiding isn't easily discarded.  I've made some changes in how I conduct essential business, not because of my attitude to COVID-19, but because the local authorities demand it.  Romans 13:1–7 has never been my favorite Bible passage, but God doesn't tell me to like His laws, only to obey them.  I can do that, even though I stumble at times.

It underscores the responsibility to vote for rational and conservative representatives at every level of government.  On the other hand, one doesn't always have such people to vote for, and it can be extremely inconvenient to "vote with your feet."  But it isn't impossible.

As a single person, it's easier for me to move.  I have often moved in order to accept different jobs, when nothing local was offered.  I won't say I have it down to a science.  At the present time, I was surprised to find that moving companies are still allowed to do business, which they aggressively pursue.  I know because it's time for me to move again.

I am currently in Denver, and local rentals are typically over $1,000 a month.  I came here for a job, but the work dried up.  It isn't because of the coronavirus, since I was able to work from home.  Work started scaling back in early November, and I became unemployed as of last Monday.  In a way, I'm glad, because I like, even need, to be busy.  I'm told that people liked my work but there was something of an unfortunate lull in making more work available.  So I can no longer afford to live here, and I wonder if driving to a new state will get me arrested.  The local governments may not agree with my assessment of how essential it is.

I have reopened my job-seeking venues and made myself available.  It's early days, and recruiters seem optimistic about placing me.  However, companies often dawdle in their hiring process, and social-distancing shutdowns don't encourage speediness.  I expect to have the month of May off, and perhaps several months after that.  I plan to enjoy the time, but this is helped by receiving Social Security.  I realize that this puts me way ahead of people who have lost their jobs over the "pandemic."  My heart goes out to all of them, out of money and absent the sense of value that comes from being employed.  I have to contend with only the latter.

If the shutdown continues, it will be a month of "maydays" instead of May days.

Like many people, I am looking forward to the end of April.  My attitude is similar to the feeling I had when living in Minnesota and winter showed signs of ending.  I will be able to leave the house for non-essential activities, like a walk in the park or by a lake.  Spring in a cold climate always reminds me of the joy of freedom.

I think the current restrictions are seriously overdone, but a lifetime of being law-abiding isn't easily discarded.  I've made some changes in how I conduct essential business, not because of my attitude to COVID-19, but because the local authorities demand it.  Romans 13:1–7 has never been my favorite Bible passage, but God doesn't tell me to like His laws, only to obey them.  I can do that, even though I stumble at times.

It underscores the responsibility to vote for rational and conservative representatives at every level of government.  On the other hand, one doesn't always have such people to vote for, and it can be extremely inconvenient to "vote with your feet."  But it isn't impossible.

As a single person, it's easier for me to move.  I have often moved in order to accept different jobs, when nothing local was offered.  I won't say I have it down to a science.  At the present time, I was surprised to find that moving companies are still allowed to do business, which they aggressively pursue.  I know because it's time for me to move again.

I am currently in Denver, and local rentals are typically over $1,000 a month.  I came here for a job, but the work dried up.  It isn't because of the coronavirus, since I was able to work from home.  Work started scaling back in early November, and I became unemployed as of last Monday.  In a way, I'm glad, because I like, even need, to be busy.  I'm told that people liked my work but there was something of an unfortunate lull in making more work available.  So I can no longer afford to live here, and I wonder if driving to a new state will get me arrested.  The local governments may not agree with my assessment of how essential it is.

I have reopened my job-seeking venues and made myself available.  It's early days, and recruiters seem optimistic about placing me.  However, companies often dawdle in their hiring process, and social-distancing shutdowns don't encourage speediness.  I expect to have the month of May off, and perhaps several months after that.  I plan to enjoy the time, but this is helped by receiving Social Security.  I realize that this puts me way ahead of people who have lost their jobs over the "pandemic."  My heart goes out to all of them, out of money and absent the sense of value that comes from being employed.  I have to contend with only the latter.

If the shutdown continues, it will be a month of "maydays" instead of May days.