Death by cabin fever

If we learn nothing else from the coronavirus hibernation strategy, we have confirmed the fact that if no one leaves his house, in the short term, fewer people die.  As any agoraphobic can tell you, danger lurks outside your personal four walls.  If you just stay at home, you reduce risk:

Now after deaths for the entire month of March are reported (by the CDC), the results show that deaths in the US this March are 15% less than the average of the past four years!

Not just deaths from the coronavirus or the flu — death itself was reduced 15% by shutting in.  At this rate, the Grim Reaper is going to need his sackcloth taken in.

Meanwhile back at the briefing room, Science-Pope Tony Fauci pontificates about the success of the "mitigation" strategy.  Indeed, Americans have found that hunkering down reduces deaths from car accidents, industrial accidents, armed robberies, and assaults in addition to the Wuhan flu, and just about every other method that kills us.  Suicides are down, too: even the depressed are sticking around to see the next act of this absurdist American drama.

Problem is, Dr. Fauci based his strategy on wobbly medical models that overestimated the severity of the panned-demic by 80%.  His model was not the only one wrong.  All of the federally funded deep-state models were way wrong.  Euthanasia fan and proponent of the 75-year age limit Zeke Emanuel (yes, Rahm's brother and now an adviser on who-knows-what for Joe Biden) overestimated coronavirus deaths by 99%.  It would be hard to get it more wrong.  Perhaps his wishful thinking acted as the thumb on his scale.

The model that Fauci used must have assumed that most Americans are obese, diabetic Alzheimer's patients taking the subway to their dialysis treatments while holding hands and eating buckets of Nancy Pelosi's favorite ice cream.

Unfortunately, living life requires taking risks.  Even something as mildly risky as leaving your house clearly engenders some deadly risk, as the comparative statistics for March 2020 show.  Come on, America!  It's spring, the season of rebirth.  It's time to drop our reservations about going back into society and the workplace.  Otherwise, this seclusion ordeal will make us all crazier than Andrew Gillum running the meth concession at a bodybuilding contest.

A quote from Emma Donoghue's Room illustrates where we are headed if we don't break quarantine:

Outside has everything. Whenever I think of a thing now like skis or fireworks or islands or elevators or yo-yos, I have to remember they're real, they're actually happening in Outside all together. It makes my head tired. And people too, firefighters teachers burglars babies saints soccer players and all sorts, they're all really in Outside. I'm not there, though, me and Ma, we're the only ones not there. Are we still real?

Are we?

Ralph Alter is an author and art dealer from Carmel, Indiana and former regular contributor to American Thinker.

If we learn nothing else from the coronavirus hibernation strategy, we have confirmed the fact that if no one leaves his house, in the short term, fewer people die.  As any agoraphobic can tell you, danger lurks outside your personal four walls.  If you just stay at home, you reduce risk:

Now after deaths for the entire month of March are reported (by the CDC), the results show that deaths in the US this March are 15% less than the average of the past four years!

Not just deaths from the coronavirus or the flu — death itself was reduced 15% by shutting in.  At this rate, the Grim Reaper is going to need his sackcloth taken in.

Meanwhile back at the briefing room, Science-Pope Tony Fauci pontificates about the success of the "mitigation" strategy.  Indeed, Americans have found that hunkering down reduces deaths from car accidents, industrial accidents, armed robberies, and assaults in addition to the Wuhan flu, and just about every other method that kills us.  Suicides are down, too: even the depressed are sticking around to see the next act of this absurdist American drama.

Problem is, Dr. Fauci based his strategy on wobbly medical models that overestimated the severity of the panned-demic by 80%.  His model was not the only one wrong.  All of the federally funded deep-state models were way wrong.  Euthanasia fan and proponent of the 75-year age limit Zeke Emanuel (yes, Rahm's brother and now an adviser on who-knows-what for Joe Biden) overestimated coronavirus deaths by 99%.  It would be hard to get it more wrong.  Perhaps his wishful thinking acted as the thumb on his scale.

The model that Fauci used must have assumed that most Americans are obese, diabetic Alzheimer's patients taking the subway to their dialysis treatments while holding hands and eating buckets of Nancy Pelosi's favorite ice cream.

Unfortunately, living life requires taking risks.  Even something as mildly risky as leaving your house clearly engenders some deadly risk, as the comparative statistics for March 2020 show.  Come on, America!  It's spring, the season of rebirth.  It's time to drop our reservations about going back into society and the workplace.  Otherwise, this seclusion ordeal will make us all crazier than Andrew Gillum running the meth concession at a bodybuilding contest.

A quote from Emma Donoghue's Room illustrates where we are headed if we don't break quarantine:

Outside has everything. Whenever I think of a thing now like skis or fireworks or islands or elevators or yo-yos, I have to remember they're real, they're actually happening in Outside all together. It makes my head tired. And people too, firefighters teachers burglars babies saints soccer players and all sorts, they're all really in Outside. I'm not there, though, me and Ma, we're the only ones not there. Are we still real?

Are we?

Ralph Alter is an author and art dealer from Carmel, Indiana and former regular contributor to American Thinker.