Kentucky jury awards $580K judgment against neighbor who attacked Rand Paul

Conservatives under physical attack in the wave of progressive terror that has been underway (and minimized by our media) are discovering that the civil lawsuits often provide more justice than the criminal law.  This no doubt will be portrayed as more than a little ironic, considering how conservatives rail against lawsuit abuse, but instances of actual harm (as opposed to theoretical damages in many class action lawsuits) are the proper concern of tort law.

Recall that Rand Paul's next-door neighbor, Rene Boucher, inflicted grave and painful physical injury (including six broken ribs) upon him, attacking him from behind as he mowed his lawn.  An enthusiastic progressive, Boucher denied that his attack was politically motivated, thereby escaping felony prosecution, and ended up with a comparative slap on the wrist that dismayed Senator Paul for his assault after a guilty plea:


Screen grab from Fox News.

Rene Boucher, 59, was also ordered Friday to one year of supervised release, a $10,000 fine and 100 hours of community service, according to WBKO.  He was also ordered to have no contact with the Paul family.

"No one deserves to be violently assaulted," Paul said in a statement Friday.  "A felony conviction with jail time is appropriate and hopefully will deter the attacker from further violence.  I commend the FBI and Department of Justice for treating this violent, pre-meditated assault with the seriousness it deserves."

Paul also said he thinks Boucher should face a longer sentence: "The original 21 month sentence requested would have been the appropriate punishment."

In addition to his month in prison, Boucher now faces what would be financial ruin for most of us.  I have no idea what his financial resources are, but he has already had to pay for lawyers in two cases, and his prospects for future income may be limited.

The Kentucky jurors awarded the following damages:

Paul, R-Ky., was awarded $375,000 in punitive damages and $200,000 for pain and suffering, plus $7,834 for medical expenses.

The punitive damages are taxable income for Senator Paul, but the pain and suffering damages and the medical reimbursement go straight to his bank account, after the lawyers take their cut (usually one third to forty percent).

Conservatives under physical attack in the wave of progressive terror that has been underway (and minimized by our media) are discovering that the civil lawsuits often provide more justice than the criminal law.  This no doubt will be portrayed as more than a little ironic, considering how conservatives rail against lawsuit abuse, but instances of actual harm (as opposed to theoretical damages in many class action lawsuits) are the proper concern of tort law.

Recall that Rand Paul's next-door neighbor, Rene Boucher, inflicted grave and painful physical injury (including six broken ribs) upon him, attacking him from behind as he mowed his lawn.  An enthusiastic progressive, Boucher denied that his attack was politically motivated, thereby escaping felony prosecution, and ended up with a comparative slap on the wrist that dismayed Senator Paul for his assault after a guilty plea:


Screen grab from Fox News.

Rene Boucher, 59, was also ordered Friday to one year of supervised release, a $10,000 fine and 100 hours of community service, according to WBKO.  He was also ordered to have no contact with the Paul family.

"No one deserves to be violently assaulted," Paul said in a statement Friday.  "A felony conviction with jail time is appropriate and hopefully will deter the attacker from further violence.  I commend the FBI and Department of Justice for treating this violent, pre-meditated assault with the seriousness it deserves."

Paul also said he thinks Boucher should face a longer sentence: "The original 21 month sentence requested would have been the appropriate punishment."

In addition to his month in prison, Boucher now faces what would be financial ruin for most of us.  I have no idea what his financial resources are, but he has already had to pay for lawyers in two cases, and his prospects for future income may be limited.

The Kentucky jurors awarded the following damages:

Paul, R-Ky., was awarded $375,000 in punitive damages and $200,000 for pain and suffering, plus $7,834 for medical expenses.

The punitive damages are taxable income for Senator Paul, but the pain and suffering damages and the medical reimbursement go straight to his bank account, after the lawyers take their cut (usually one third to forty percent).