Former McCain campaign official Nicolle Wallace indulges in violent anti-Trump fantasies on MSNBC air

I have long regarded Nicolle Wallace, who was Sarah Palin's "handler" on the McCain-Palin ticket in 2008, as a turncoat.  In her book, Going Rogue, Palin accused Wallace of setting her up for an ambush in the infamous Katie Couric interview that was used to discredit Palin for her seeming unpreparedness.  Wallace adamantly denied that and called Palin a liar.

Now a Trump-hating host on MSNBC, Wallace shows clinical signs of Trump Derangement Syndrome.  What else but actual derangement could lead a media figure of some standing to start spouting violent fantasies, something Wallace has now done twice?


YouTube screen grab.

Back in May, she suggested that it must be difficult for White House correspondents to resist the impulse to "wring" the neck of Sarah Sanders:

She later apologized:

But obviously she has not learned her lesson.  Or, even more alarmingly, perhaps she has an irresistible impulse to suggest becoming violent against Republicans she hates?  Irresistible impulses, after all, are a factor that can lead to institutionalization when combined with violence.  Here is what Wallace suggested Thursday:

This is crazy talk, deeply antagonistic to the ideals of a constitutional republic.  These outbursts should, but won't, be career-enders.

I have long regarded Nicolle Wallace, who was Sarah Palin's "handler" on the McCain-Palin ticket in 2008, as a turncoat.  In her book, Going Rogue, Palin accused Wallace of setting her up for an ambush in the infamous Katie Couric interview that was used to discredit Palin for her seeming unpreparedness.  Wallace adamantly denied that and called Palin a liar.

Now a Trump-hating host on MSNBC, Wallace shows clinical signs of Trump Derangement Syndrome.  What else but actual derangement could lead a media figure of some standing to start spouting violent fantasies, something Wallace has now done twice?


YouTube screen grab.

Back in May, she suggested that it must be difficult for White House correspondents to resist the impulse to "wring" the neck of Sarah Sanders:

She later apologized:

But obviously she has not learned her lesson.  Or, even more alarmingly, perhaps she has an irresistible impulse to suggest becoming violent against Republicans she hates?  Irresistible impulses, after all, are a factor that can lead to institutionalization when combined with violence.  Here is what Wallace suggested Thursday:

This is crazy talk, deeply antagonistic to the ideals of a constitutional republic.  These outbursts should, but won't, be career-enders.