Chicago cops release body cam footage of fatal shooting following violent protests

Body cameras, demanded by many anti-police activists, are turning out to be a boon for the vast majority of cops.  Saturday saw a violent reaction in Chicago, shortly after police there shot and killed a man.  The Chicago Tribune's early account of the incident:

The shooting occurred after patrol officers on foot saw a man who was "exhibiting characteristics of an armed person," Guglielmi said.  "He looked like he may have something on him.  They go to question him, and at that point a confrontation ensues and he is shot."

The man shot, a barber, had just left his barber shop, and his shooting almost immediately provoked an outraged reaction from the surrounding community:

The shooting happened around 5:30 p.m. at 2098 E. 71st St., and it took police about five hours to bring things under control.  Some people screamed "murderers" as officers lined up against them.  Some in the crowd held cameras up to take video, while others behind them threw rocks and glass bottles, some filled with urine.

As officers tried to contain the crowd, some of them dragged people to the ground or struck them with batons.  Other officers held batons over their heads to ward off people yelling at them.

"You violent [m‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑]," one woman in the crowd screamed.

Faced with the possibility of escalating outrage over a man who might be characterized as "unarmed" by people rushing to protest, the Chicago Police Department hurriedly released body cam video that showed that the man was indeed armed and made motions that could indicate using his firearm against the police.

Here is a still frame close-up of the gun:

And here is a still frame showing the deceased man taking a shooter's grip on the gun:

Two versions of the body cam video, one using slow motion, were released (view here).

The Chicago cop blog Second City Cop asks:

Anyone know when the community is going to start lining up to offer apologies to the Officers and the Chicago Police Department for their lies, slanders, assaults, batteries, and generally being [a‑‑‑‑‑‑‑] flying off the handle based on incomplete and pretty much wrong information?

Body cameras, demanded by many anti-police activists, are turning out to be a boon for the vast majority of cops.  Saturday saw a violent reaction in Chicago, shortly after police there shot and killed a man.  The Chicago Tribune's early account of the incident:

The shooting occurred after patrol officers on foot saw a man who was "exhibiting characteristics of an armed person," Guglielmi said.  "He looked like he may have something on him.  They go to question him, and at that point a confrontation ensues and he is shot."

The man shot, a barber, had just left his barber shop, and his shooting almost immediately provoked an outraged reaction from the surrounding community:

The shooting happened around 5:30 p.m. at 2098 E. 71st St., and it took police about five hours to bring things under control.  Some people screamed "murderers" as officers lined up against them.  Some in the crowd held cameras up to take video, while others behind them threw rocks and glass bottles, some filled with urine.

As officers tried to contain the crowd, some of them dragged people to the ground or struck them with batons.  Other officers held batons over their heads to ward off people yelling at them.

"You violent [m‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑]," one woman in the crowd screamed.

Faced with the possibility of escalating outrage over a man who might be characterized as "unarmed" by people rushing to protest, the Chicago Police Department hurriedly released body cam video that showed that the man was indeed armed and made motions that could indicate using his firearm against the police.

Here is a still frame close-up of the gun:

And here is a still frame showing the deceased man taking a shooter's grip on the gun:

Two versions of the body cam video, one using slow motion, were released (view here).

The Chicago cop blog Second City Cop asks:

Anyone know when the community is going to start lining up to offer apologies to the Officers and the Chicago Police Department for their lies, slanders, assaults, batteries, and generally being [a‑‑‑‑‑‑‑] flying off the handle based on incomplete and pretty much wrong information?