Producer of Chappaquiddick movie claims 'powerful people' in Hollywood pressured him to not release it

Howie Carr is the Kennedy Family's least favorite journalist of all time, author of the book Kennedy Babylon, whose subtitle gives away his perspective: "A Century of Scandal and Depravity."

Thus, it is not surprising that Howie is all over the release of the movie Chappaquiddick.  In his column today, he makes a number of great points about the previous investigations into the car crash that ended up with Ted Kennedy charged merely with leaving the scene of an accident.

The crimes Teddy could have been – but wasn't – charged with include manslaughter, drunken driving, vehicular homicide and driving without a license.  Instead, he was allowed to plead guilty to a single count of leaving the scene of an accident.  There was no autopsy, for obvious reasons.  A few months after her death, the Kennedys blocked the exhumation of Mary Jo Kopechne's body.  A decade later, the National Enquirer bought a story from a Washington Post columnist alleging that Mary Jo was pregnant at the time she died.

That story was told in a book by an heir to the supermarket tabloid.  The Enquirer story itself has never been printed, but it is on the public record that Mary Jo was drunk at the time of her death, and was not wearing underwear.

Kopechne was, as producer [Byron] Allen told Variety, "one of the original #MeToo victims."

As were, I would add, Marilyn Monroe, Gloria Swanson, Mimi Alford, Mary Pinchot Meyer, Pam Kelley, the blue-dot Au Bar woman and a whole host of other females who consorted, in one way or another, with the Kennedy men.

In the wake of #MeToo and the death of Teddy, finally, the public will get to see something with a little depth about the accident.  Up until now, the Kennedy family has been able to pretty much kill poplar representations of the information.

[K]illing negative media coverage of the family is nothing new.  In 1985, the Kennedys spiked a 27-minute ABC News documentary about the unanswered questions surrounding the death of Marilyn Monroe, and the role that Bobby Kennedy played in her passing.  One of the reporters on the story was Geraldo Rivera, and he ended up fired for insubordination.

A decade later, on his own TV show, a Kennedy cousin explained to Rivera what had happened to his network career.

"Quite honestly," Kerry Kennedy McCarthy, one of Joe's nieces, told him, "you were a victim of the family.  The family had become used to hearing the truth about Jack.  But when it was Bobby..."

Perhaps telling the truth about the disgusting behavior of Ted Kennedy, the "Lion of the Senate," will help Americans who are not conservative political junkies realize what bill of goods they have been sold about this family that many liberals endowed with quasi-royal status.

Howie Carr is the Kennedy Family's least favorite journalist of all time, author of the book Kennedy Babylon, whose subtitle gives away his perspective: "A Century of Scandal and Depravity."

Thus, it is not surprising that Howie is all over the release of the movie Chappaquiddick.  In his column today, he makes a number of great points about the previous investigations into the car crash that ended up with Ted Kennedy charged merely with leaving the scene of an accident.

The crimes Teddy could have been – but wasn't – charged with include manslaughter, drunken driving, vehicular homicide and driving without a license.  Instead, he was allowed to plead guilty to a single count of leaving the scene of an accident.  There was no autopsy, for obvious reasons.  A few months after her death, the Kennedys blocked the exhumation of Mary Jo Kopechne's body.  A decade later, the National Enquirer bought a story from a Washington Post columnist alleging that Mary Jo was pregnant at the time she died.

That story was told in a book by an heir to the supermarket tabloid.  The Enquirer story itself has never been printed, but it is on the public record that Mary Jo was drunk at the time of her death, and was not wearing underwear.

Kopechne was, as producer [Byron] Allen told Variety, "one of the original #MeToo victims."

As were, I would add, Marilyn Monroe, Gloria Swanson, Mimi Alford, Mary Pinchot Meyer, Pam Kelley, the blue-dot Au Bar woman and a whole host of other females who consorted, in one way or another, with the Kennedy men.

In the wake of #MeToo and the death of Teddy, finally, the public will get to see something with a little depth about the accident.  Up until now, the Kennedy family has been able to pretty much kill poplar representations of the information.

[K]illing negative media coverage of the family is nothing new.  In 1985, the Kennedys spiked a 27-minute ABC News documentary about the unanswered questions surrounding the death of Marilyn Monroe, and the role that Bobby Kennedy played in her passing.  One of the reporters on the story was Geraldo Rivera, and he ended up fired for insubordination.

A decade later, on his own TV show, a Kennedy cousin explained to Rivera what had happened to his network career.

"Quite honestly," Kerry Kennedy McCarthy, one of Joe's nieces, told him, "you were a victim of the family.  The family had become used to hearing the truth about Jack.  But when it was Bobby..."

Perhaps telling the truth about the disgusting behavior of Ted Kennedy, the "Lion of the Senate," will help Americans who are not conservative political junkies realize what bill of goods they have been sold about this family that many liberals endowed with quasi-royal status.