March Madness 2020: Day-by-Day

On Facebook, a more civil medium than Twitter, I chronicled the passage of this unusual month of March without any idea at the beginning how mad it would actually get towards the end. So much has happened so quickly I thought it might be worth a summary.

March 1: “There is much to be said for old white men, but when you claim to be the party of "diversity," and Joe Biden is the youngest of your three viable candidates, all eyeball deep in white privilege, the ‘optics’ aren't exactly great.”

March 4: “Missouri’s primary is open, meaning you don’t have to declare your party affiliation ahead of time. Just show up to your polling place and ask for the party ballot you want. Personally, I'm feeling the Bern!”

March 4: I also posted an article to promote the novel I co-wrote with Mike McMullen called The Hunt.  We wrote the novel in part to give young men something other than the “routinely effete, feminist, anti-Christian, socialistic and often gay” novels they are assigned in school.

March 7: This was the first I wrote about COVID-19 and only then because of the three-week lead-time for the regional business magazine of which I am contributing editor. Titled “Light Rail in the Time of Corona,” it begins, “Our Portlandia-types have long had all the answers: If only they could concentrate the population in densely packed areas and move people around on public transportation, they could save us all from some newly discovered blight or another. And then that black swan called the coronavirus came floating down the Missouri.”

March 9: I posted a photo from “The Walking Dead” with the caption, “When they come back to life it’s a crisis. Until then it’s just another problem to be solved.”

March 9: “Now for a little good news. My forthcoming book is up on Amazon.” The book is titled Unmasking Obama, pub date, August 18.

March 11: I posted a photo from my neighborhood grocery in Kansas City of shelves still stocked with toilet paper. I commented, “In the saner parts of the world…” Two days later, I could not have done the same.

March 12: On hearing that the NCAA basketball tournament was cancelled, a decision I still believe was wrong, I posted a photo of Purdue University point guard Eric Hunter with the following caption: “Silver linings: Eric Hunter has to make one free throw with 2 seconds left in final game and Purdue goes to NCAAs. He misses. Rutgers wins. Eric has all year to fret about how he cost Purdue an invitation… until he doesn't.” Boiler up!

March 13: I posted a promotion for a March 21 Republican event in Leavenworth at which I was scheduled to speak. I wrote, “I am assured this will not be cancelled. If it is, I am showing up anyhow. STOP CANCELLING STUFF!” Yes, it was cancelled. The authorities mandated so. I didn’t show up.

March 15: I posted a photo from the back of traditional Catholic Church I attend, saying, “Mass this morning. Average crowd. Stop the silliness.” The response was strong and positive.

March 16: The mayor of Kansas City had just announced an end to any events with more than 50 people. I posted, “As of yesterday, Missouri had 4 confirmed cases of COVID-19, a.k.a. the Corona virus, and ZERO fatalities. And we're shutting down the economy? Event planners, hold your ground.”

March 18: I posted a photo from a park at which I had been taking increasingly long walks. “Best walking trail in metro KC. Shawnee Mission Park, west Midland entrance

Big hill. Good for the lungs.”

March 19: I posted an image of the Decameron. “For a little perspective, Boccaccio wrote this as something of a tonic for the Black Death that was then ravaging Italy and all of Europe. It is often laugh out loud funny. If you have bored students at home, this beats Call of Duty.”

March 20: I posted an image of Bonhoeffer by Eric Metaxas. “A useful read in the genre of ‘So you think you've got problems?’ Just finished it last night. I particularly recommend it for those who are confident they are wiser than God.”

March 20: Upon hearing of the California lockdown order, I posted, “As Ben Franklin put it, ‘Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.’" I was glad I didn’t live in California! They would never do that in KC.

March 21: Upon learning that the KC Metro was being put under a “stay-at-home” order, I posted, “This is f**ing madness. There have been a total of FOUR deaths in all of Kansas and Missouri.” I used asterisks in the original. One of the few liberals who followed me posted in response, “I hope you’re number 5.” That’s who they are.

March 22: I tried to muster support for a public protest of the lockdown. The high-volume response was very divided, even among conservatives. Not enough people volunteered to show up to make it worth staging.

March 24: I posted my American Thinker article titled, “Reflections on a Century of Junk Science.” My thesis: “Never before has a mania wreaked so much havoc so quickly as the COVID-19 scare. Many of the predictions are as incredible as those for heterosexual aids, and even if accurate, they do not justify the assault on our economy and our very freedoms.”

March 26: I posted my WND article titled, “So when did we all become such pansies?” I commented, “Although the 1957 Asian flu killed 70,000 Americans and struck children with force, the schools did not close. The economy churned along, and Lou Burdette threw three COMPLETE games in packed stadiums to humiliate the Yankees which, providentially, I got to watch from my sickbed. Better still, no one got called ‘racist’ for saying Asian flu.’” Huge response, very positive.

March 26: I posted, “A quick survey: Do you know anyone personally who has or has had the Corona Virus? If yes, what has been that person's experience. If no, do you know anybody who knows anybody?” None of the 150 or so respondents had the disease. At least two-thirds of the respondents did not know anyone who did. Given that my extended family lives in New Jersey, I know one person, who is currently recovering.

March 27: I posted a George Carlin video clip titled, “You are All Diseased.” Said I, “A man ahead of his times. A few F-Bombs but remarkably prescient (and funny). This dates from 1999. Carlin died in 2008.”

March 31: I posted a graph of the numbers from Kansas and Missouri, saying, “For a little perspective, if March were an average month 4300 Missourians would have died from all causes, not including abortion. 13 have died from Covid-19.”

March 31: I posted a CNN article, headlined “Abortion is a human right. A pandemic doesn’t change that.” I commented, “For a little more perspective, 2860 Americans have died so far of Covid-19. Based on past averages 2874 very young Americans will have died TODAY of abortion. Just sayin'.” Strong response. Liberals had no comeback.

Some 70,000 Americans died of the Asian Flu. In my “Pansy” article, I observed, “The population of the United States in 1957 was roughly half of what it is today. Were wagering on life and death not so distasteful, I would gladly take the ‘under’ position in an over-under bet that COVID-19 will kill 140,000 Americans.”

As much as I hope deaths are minimal, I would feel better for us as a country if I lose that bet. We would have abandoned our fundamental freedoms and wrecked our economy for a cause that we could at least somehow possibly justify to future generations of Americans.

On Facebook, a more civil medium than Twitter, I chronicled the passage of this unusual month of March without any idea at the beginning how mad it would actually get towards the end. So much has happened so quickly I thought it might be worth a summary.

March 1: “There is much to be said for old white men, but when you claim to be the party of "diversity," and Joe Biden is the youngest of your three viable candidates, all eyeball deep in white privilege, the ‘optics’ aren't exactly great.”

March 4: “Missouri’s primary is open, meaning you don’t have to declare your party affiliation ahead of time. Just show up to your polling place and ask for the party ballot you want. Personally, I'm feeling the Bern!”

March 4: I also posted an article to promote the novel I co-wrote with Mike McMullen called The Hunt.  We wrote the novel in part to give young men something other than the “routinely effete, feminist, anti-Christian, socialistic and often gay” novels they are assigned in school.

March 7: This was the first I wrote about COVID-19 and only then because of the three-week lead-time for the regional business magazine of which I am contributing editor. Titled “Light Rail in the Time of Corona,” it begins, “Our Portlandia-types have long had all the answers: If only they could concentrate the population in densely packed areas and move people around on public transportation, they could save us all from some newly discovered blight or another. And then that black swan called the coronavirus came floating down the Missouri.”

March 9: I posted a photo from “The Walking Dead” with the caption, “When they come back to life it’s a crisis. Until then it’s just another problem to be solved.”

March 9: “Now for a little good news. My forthcoming book is up on Amazon.” The book is titled Unmasking Obama, pub date, August 18.

March 11: I posted a photo from my neighborhood grocery in Kansas City of shelves still stocked with toilet paper. I commented, “In the saner parts of the world…” Two days later, I could not have done the same.

March 12: On hearing that the NCAA basketball tournament was cancelled, a decision I still believe was wrong, I posted a photo of Purdue University point guard Eric Hunter with the following caption: “Silver linings: Eric Hunter has to make one free throw with 2 seconds left in final game and Purdue goes to NCAAs. He misses. Rutgers wins. Eric has all year to fret about how he cost Purdue an invitation… until he doesn't.” Boiler up!

March 13: I posted a promotion for a March 21 Republican event in Leavenworth at which I was scheduled to speak. I wrote, “I am assured this will not be cancelled. If it is, I am showing up anyhow. STOP CANCELLING STUFF!” Yes, it was cancelled. The authorities mandated so. I didn’t show up.

March 15: I posted a photo from the back of traditional Catholic Church I attend, saying, “Mass this morning. Average crowd. Stop the silliness.” The response was strong and positive.

March 16: The mayor of Kansas City had just announced an end to any events with more than 50 people. I posted, “As of yesterday, Missouri had 4 confirmed cases of COVID-19, a.k.a. the Corona virus, and ZERO fatalities. And we're shutting down the economy? Event planners, hold your ground.”

March 18: I posted a photo from a park at which I had been taking increasingly long walks. “Best walking trail in metro KC. Shawnee Mission Park, west Midland entrance

Big hill. Good for the lungs.”

March 19: I posted an image of the Decameron. “For a little perspective, Boccaccio wrote this as something of a tonic for the Black Death that was then ravaging Italy and all of Europe. It is often laugh out loud funny. If you have bored students at home, this beats Call of Duty.”

March 20: I posted an image of Bonhoeffer by Eric Metaxas. “A useful read in the genre of ‘So you think you've got problems?’ Just finished it last night. I particularly recommend it for those who are confident they are wiser than God.”

March 20: Upon hearing of the California lockdown order, I posted, “As Ben Franklin put it, ‘Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.’" I was glad I didn’t live in California! They would never do that in KC.

March 21: Upon learning that the KC Metro was being put under a “stay-at-home” order, I posted, “This is f**ing madness. There have been a total of FOUR deaths in all of Kansas and Missouri.” I used asterisks in the original. One of the few liberals who followed me posted in response, “I hope you’re number 5.” That’s who they are.

March 22: I tried to muster support for a public protest of the lockdown. The high-volume response was very divided, even among conservatives. Not enough people volunteered to show up to make it worth staging.

March 24: I posted my American Thinker article titled, “Reflections on a Century of Junk Science.” My thesis: “Never before has a mania wreaked so much havoc so quickly as the COVID-19 scare. Many of the predictions are as incredible as those for heterosexual aids, and even if accurate, they do not justify the assault on our economy and our very freedoms.”

March 26: I posted my WND article titled, “So when did we all become such pansies?” I commented, “Although the 1957 Asian flu killed 70,000 Americans and struck children with force, the schools did not close. The economy churned along, and Lou Burdette threw three COMPLETE games in packed stadiums to humiliate the Yankees which, providentially, I got to watch from my sickbed. Better still, no one got called ‘racist’ for saying Asian flu.’” Huge response, very positive.

March 26: I posted, “A quick survey: Do you know anyone personally who has or has had the Corona Virus? If yes, what has been that person's experience. If no, do you know anybody who knows anybody?” None of the 150 or so respondents had the disease. At least two-thirds of the respondents did not know anyone who did. Given that my extended family lives in New Jersey, I know one person, who is currently recovering.

March 27: I posted a George Carlin video clip titled, “You are All Diseased.” Said I, “A man ahead of his times. A few F-Bombs but remarkably prescient (and funny). This dates from 1999. Carlin died in 2008.”

March 31: I posted a graph of the numbers from Kansas and Missouri, saying, “For a little perspective, if March were an average month 4300 Missourians would have died from all causes, not including abortion. 13 have died from Covid-19.”

March 31: I posted a CNN article, headlined “Abortion is a human right. A pandemic doesn’t change that.” I commented, “For a little more perspective, 2860 Americans have died so far of Covid-19. Based on past averages 2874 very young Americans will have died TODAY of abortion. Just sayin'.” Strong response. Liberals had no comeback.

Some 70,000 Americans died of the Asian Flu. In my “Pansy” article, I observed, “The population of the United States in 1957 was roughly half of what it is today. Were wagering on life and death not so distasteful, I would gladly take the ‘under’ position in an over-under bet that COVID-19 will kill 140,000 Americans.”

As much as I hope deaths are minimal, I would feel better for us as a country if I lose that bet. We would have abandoned our fundamental freedoms and wrecked our economy for a cause that we could at least somehow possibly justify to future generations of Americans.